Chicago Substance Use Prevention Services
CSFA Number: 444-26-1551
Agency Name
Department Of Human Services (444)
Agency Contact
Shantel High
217.557.2707
Shantel.High@illinois.gov
Short Description
There are three primary areas that service delivery will focus on in the City of Chicago:

• Reduce the rate of marijuana use among 8th-12th graders.
• Reduce the non-medical use of prescription drugs among 8th-12th grader and adults.
• Increase and/or maintain participation of public schools in the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS).

CSAPS services targets various populations depending on the service. The primary target population for each drug and strategy follows below. The grant will support universal and selected services serving youth ages 12-18 or students in grades 6th-12th. Universal prevention strategies address the entire population with messages aimed at preventing alcohol and/or substance abuse; selected strategies target subsets that are deemed to be at risk for abuse.

Marijuana-Focused Prevention
• Youth ages 12-18 or students in grades 6th-12th grades are the target of the evidence-based curriculum/a focused on marijuana use outcomes.
• Youth ages 12-18 or students in grades 6th-12th are the target of the communication campaign(s).
• Retailers are the focus of environmental scan and retail education services.
• The community is the target for the events associated with the National Prevention Week.

Prescription Drug-Focused Prevention
• The community is the target for the promotion of the drug take back programs.
• Youth ages 12-18 and students in grades 6th-12th are the target of the additional session addressing opioids.
• Youth ages 12-18 or students in grades 6th-12th are the target of the communication campaign(s).
• Adults are the focus of the educational activities addressing social access.

Illinois Youth Survey Administration
• Schools housing 8th-12th grade levels are the target of the recruitment activities.
Subject Area
Human Services
Program Function
Health
Enabling Legislation
20 ILCS 301 Short Title - Alcoholism and Other Drug Abuse and Dependency Act
Objectives and Goals
Goal 1: Reduce 30-day marijuana rates among 8th-12th graders in the service area by addressing the following priority contributing factors:
• Reduce the perception of being seen as cool if youth smoked marijuana.
• Increase personal disapproval to counter the finding that youth are least likely to personally hold the opinion that teen marijuana use is “wrong” or “very wrong.”
• Increase peer disapproval to counter the finding that their friends are less likely to feel it would be “wrong” or “very wrong” if youth used marijuana.
• Decrease the perception that marijuana is “sort of easy” or “very easy” to get if youth wanted some.

Goal 2: Reduce the non-medical use of prescription drugs by 8th-12th graders and adults in the service area by addressing the following contributing factors:
• Decrease the availability (social access) of prescription drugs.
• Increase personal disapproval to counter that youth are likely to personally hold the opinion that teen prescription use is “wrong” or “very wrong.”
• Increase peer disapproval to counter youth’s friends are less likely to feel it would be “wrong” or “very wrong” if youth used prescription drugs.

Goal 3: Using the IYS 2016: Percent of Public Schools Completed by CCAs map as a baseline, increase and/or maintain IYS participation of public schools, at minimum, in the service area to ensure that at least 70% of the students in each grade (8th, 10th, and 12th) in the public schools participate.
Types of Assistance
Project Grants
Uses and Restrictions
CSAPS programs must deliver the following services.

1. Deliver evidence-based Youth Prevention Education model programs
• Select and deliver an evidence-based model youth prevention education program(s) that has demonstrated outcomes in reducing marijuana use with 6th-12th grade students.
• In coordination with the delivery of the evidence-based curriculum/a, deliver an additional session addressing opioids. For more information regarding the additional opioid sessions, visit:

https://www.prevention.org/Professional-Resources/Professional-Resources/Opioid-Education-Resources/

• Deliver the selected evidence-based youth prevention education curriculum/a with fidelity in schools during the school day and for the entire grade (i.e., all 6th grade students or all freshman) with the target of at least one entire grade level between 6th-12th grade students.

See Appendix B for the list of the evidence-based Youth Prevention Education model programs.

2. Plan for and deliver two communication campaigns addressing the contributing factors related to past 30-day marijuana use and non-medical use of prescription drugs
• Promote and implement a communication campaign that aligns with IDHS evidence-based standards (e.g., focus group testing, determining the communication channels best for the community, reinforcing the message) that address the contributing factors for reducing past 30-day marijuana use in high schools and/or communities.
• Promote and implement a communication campaign that aligns with IDHS evidence-based standards (e.g., focus group testing, determining the communication channels best for the community, reinforcing the message) that address the contributing factors for reducing prescription drug use.

See Appendix C for the communication campaign planning and implementation standards.

3. Recruit schools to participate in the administration of the IYS
• Identify and create a list of all schools (public, private, charter, parochial, other) in the service area that house 8th, 10th, and 12th grades. The list will include the name of the school, address, and name of the principal and name of another school representative or contact that can be instrumental in recruitment.
• Create and implement an annual IYS Recruitment Action Plan to increase IYS participation of public schools, at minimum, in the service area.
• Provide regular reports to IDHS regarding progress towards IYS recruitment and administration. The deadlines and format to for reporting will be determined by IDHS.

For more information regarding the Illinois Youth Survey: iys.cprd.illinois.edu/

4. Conduct two activities that focus on (1) youth marijuana use and (2) prescription and opioid drug use that match the daily health themes according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Prevention Week schedule
• Engage the Youth Advisory Committee in the planning of two activities.
• Promote the event with local media, schools, and community residents in the service area. At least three channels must be identified and used to promote the events in the service area.
• Report the date, time, location, and a brief description of each activity at least 30 days in advance to IDHS or its provider.
• Conduct two activities that are designed to raise community awareness regarding (1) youth marijuana use and (2) prescription drugs and opioids use in accordance with and during SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week schedule.

To learn more about SAMHSA’s National Prevention Week: https://www.samhsa.gov/prevention-week/

5. Conduct an environmental scan to assess retailers for selling marijuana paraphernalia and conduct retail education
• Conduct an environmental scan (use an assessment tool that includes types and location of the paraphernalia) that identifies which retailers sell marijuana paraphernalia.
• Report the number of retailers that sell marijuana paraphernalia in the service area.
• Create a plan to educate retailers regarding the consequences and community benefits of not selling marijuana paraphernalia.
• Conduct retail education activities with merchants that sell marijuana paraphernalia in the service area.

6. Raise awareness regarding the drug take-back programs in the service area
• Identify the locations in the service area that take back prescription drugs and make a list that includes the name of the place, address, and hours of operation (if applicable).
• Plan for and distribute the list in the service area.
• Plan for and distribute educational materials about the potential for abuse of medications, safe disposal and safe storage.
• Promote a prescription drug-take back event in the service area in coordination with the National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day which aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs while also educating the public about the potential for abuse of medications.

7. Establish a Youth Advisory Committee
• Develop and/or work with an existing Youth Advisory Committee. Members of the committee must represent the service area.

If one or more age groups are targeted to participate on the committee, the youth must be close in age (no more than three years difference).

Youth must reflect the demographics in the community and include a cross-representation of youth (e.g., low to high or no school and/community involvement, good to poor academic performance, low to high or no school attendance, diverse areas of interests and hobbies, values, beliefs, and perspectives, reflective of LGBTQ-oriented youth).

At least 12 youth must serve on the committee and participate in the regularly scheduled meetings.

The committee must regularly (e.g., weekly, monthly and not daily) meet during the school year, at minimum.
• The Youth Advisory Committee should be engaged in the following activities, at minimum, to ensure all services and activities are relevant for the target population: (1) the communication campaign(s), (2) National Prevention Week activities, and (3) environmental scan of marijuana paraphernalia and retail education services.

8. Develop a Resource Guide
Develop one resource guide that identifies all substance use disorder treatment and human service organizations (e.g., afterschool programs, mental health counseling, sexual assault prevention, school-based health clinics that are open to the community) in and near the service area for linkage and referral purposes.
Eligibility Requirements
The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) is seeking applications from community-based public and private not-for-profit organizations and governmental units to provide substance use disorder prevention services in Chicago, Illinois.
Eligible Applicants
Government Organizations; Education Organizations; Nonprofit Organizations; Public Housing Organizations;
Application and Award Processing
Criteria: Funding is not guaranteed. All Applicants must demonstrate that they meet all requirements under this NoFO as described throughout. Applications that fail to meet the criteria described in “Eligible Applicants” as identified in Section C “Eligibility Information” will not be scored and considered for funding.

Review teams comprised of three individuals serving in IDHS will be assigned to review applications. Applications will first be reviewed and scored individually. Scores will be sent to the application Review Coordinator to be compiled and averaged to produce the final application score.

Application Scoring: Application Narratives will be evaluated on the following criteria:

Executive Summary Not scored
Capacity – Agency Qualifications 20 points
Designated Service Area 10 points
Needs Statement 20 points
Description of Program Services 40 points
Agency Evaluation and Reporting 10 points
Budget and Budget Narrative Not scored

TOTAL 100 POINTS

The application criteria to be reviewed and scored are found under each category in this announcement in Section F. Content and Form of Application Submission.

NOTE REGARDING LOCAL OFFICE COORDINATION: Up to an additional 5 points will be awarded to agencies whose applications include plans to coordinate with the local DHS Family and Community Resource Center(s) to advertise job vacancies and hire TANF and SNAP clients.

a) Pre-application Coordination.
Applicant agencies are not eligible for a grant award until they have pre-qualified through the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA) Grantee Portal, www.grants.illinois.gov. During pre-qualification, Dun and Bradstreet verifications are performed including a check of Debarred and Suspended status and good standing with the Secretary of State. The pre-qualification process also includes a financial and administrative risk assessment utilizing an Internal Controls Questionnaire and a programmatic risk assessment. If applicable, the agency will be notified that it is ineligible for award as a result of the Dun and Bradstreet verification. The entity will be informed of corrective action needed to become eligible for a grant award.

b) The Application Procedure.
An Application must be submitted in the format required by the Department and in the manner dictated by the Department. Refer to NOFO for detailed information.

c) Award Procedure.
1) An award shall be made pursuant to a written determination based on the evaluation criteria set forth in the grant application. A Notice of State Award (NOSA) will be issued to enable the applicant to make an informed decision to accept the grant award. The NOSA shall include:
a. The terms and condition of the award.
b. Specific conditions assigned to the grantee based on the fiscal and administrative and programmatic risk assessments.
3) Upon acceptance of the grant award, announcement of the grant award shall be published by the awarding agency to Grants.Illinois.gov.
4) A written Notice of Denial shall be sent to the applicants not receiving awards.

d) Appeals.
Refer to DHS Merit Based Review Policy - Appeals Process
Funding By Fiscal Year
FY 2018 : $3,750,000
Federal Funding
Notice of Funding Opportunities
None
Agency IDGrantee NameStart DateEnd DateAmount
43CYZ03541-43CYZ03541PILSEN LITTLE VILLAGE COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENT07/01/201906/30/2020538,125
43CYZ03538-43CYZ03538HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE, INC. HRDI07/01/201906/30/2020435,625
43CYZ03540-43CYZ03540Metropolitan Family Services07/01/201906/30/2020307,482
43CYZ03542-43CYZ03542PREVENTION PARTNERSHIP INC07/01/201906/30/2020266,500
43CYZ03536-43CYZ03536FULFILLING OUR RESPONSIBILITY UNTO MANKIND, FORUM07/01/201906/30/2020230,625