Community Youth Employment Program (CYEP)
CSFA Number: 444-80-1444
Agency Name
Department Of Human Services (444)
Agency Identification
DFCS
Agency Contact
Karrie Rueter
217-557-2943
DHS.Youthservicesinfo@illinois.gov
Short Description
The Community Youth Employment Program (CYEP) is a year round grant opportunity that requires a holistic approach to unsubsidized employment for transition-age youth (16-24). This approach will account for the youth’s physical, emotional, social, and mental health needs while helping them to secure and sustain employment and/or achieve higher education ensuring a greater likelihood of success and self-sufficiency. In an effort to foster healthy, safe, well-educated, and self-sufficient transition-age youth in Illinois, the Department of Human Services (DHS) is making this year round grant opportunity available to provide eligible youth with educational enhancement opportunities, full and part-time job placements, and case management services to include life skills, counseling and work readiness for both in-school and out-of-school youth. Once the right services and support are in place, it is essential that youth are placed in long-term employment opportunities that meet their developmental skill level and put them on a path to improved education and economic self-sufficiency.
Subject Area
Human Services
Program Function
Education Employment, Labor, and Training
Enabling Legislation
None
Objectives and Goals
To provide eligible youth with comprehensive case management services, educational enhancement opportunities, and full and part-time job placements in an effort to foster healthy, safe, well-educated, and self-sufficient transition-age youth.
Types of Assistance
Project Grants
Uses and Restrictions
A. Program Description
The Community Youth Employment Program (CYEP) is a year round grant opportunity that requires a holistic approach to unsubsidized employment for transition-age youth (16-24). This approach will account for the youth’s physical, emotional, social, and mental health needs while helping them to secure and sustain employment and/or achieve higher education ensuring a greater likelihood of success and self-sufficiency. In an effort to foster healthy, safe, well-educated, and self-sufficient transition-age youth in Illinois, the Department of Human Services (DHS) is making this year round grant opportunity available to provide eligible youth with educational enhancement opportunities, full and part-time job placements, and case management services to include life skills, counseling and work readiness for both in-school and out-of-school youth.

Creating a path forward for transition-aged youth requires a holistic approach that considers all aspects of the youth’s realities and needs including both employment and education. For youth to successfully connect into the employment and education world there needs to be access to support that is comprehensive and coordinated including addressing an array of basic needs such as housing, healthcare, childcare, transportation, legal support, and connection to the community.

Services must also be developmentally appropriate and tailored to address the unique needs of the youth. Research on adolescent brain development finds that executive functioning and self-regulation skills are not fully developed until youth are in their mid-twenties. These are the critical skills that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, and juggle multiple tasks successfully. The brain needs this skill set to filter distractions, prioritize tasks, set and achieve goals, and control impulses. CYEP program models must consider these facts when designing how youth will be served in their programs. These youth have unique strengths and challenges that must be embraced as part of their preparation for education and employment opportunities. A developmentally appropriate approach will help to build the protective factors that foster resiliency and increase long-term success.

Once the right services and support are in place, it is essential that youth are placed in long-term employment opportunities that meet their developmental skill level and put them on a path to improved education and economic self-sufficiency.

Employment Placements
The applicant should determine the targeted population (in-school or out of school youth ages 16-24) that will be served through this year round grant and design the program in accordance with the information outlined below:

A. Part-Time Employment for In-School Youth (ages 16-24)
Projects targeting in-school youth will provide part-time employment opportunities. Work experience opportunities may be offered under the category of work readiness skills but wages will not be paid by this grant for work experience and work experience will not be considered employment. Eligible youth will be placed in age-appropriate, ability-appropriate, and experience-appropriate employment linked to one of the sixteen career clusters identified below. The objective for in-school youth served is sustained, unsubsidized part-time employment. This may be accomplished by directly placing and supporting youth in unsubsidized employment, or through an agreement with the employer to partially subsidize the youth’s wage for a period not to exceed 6 months. This grant will typically be used to subsidize 3 to 6 months of part-time employment. In-School youth are those youth actively pursuing their high school diploma or GED.

B. Full-Time Employment for Out-of-School Youth (ages 16-24)
Projects targeting in-school youth will provide full-time employment opportunities. Work experience opportunities may be offered under the category of work readiness skills but wages will not be paid by this grant for work experience and work experience will not be considered employment. Eligible youth will be placed in age-appropriate, ability-appropriate, and experience-appropriate employment linked to one of the sixteen career clusters identified below. The objective for out-of-school youth served is sustained, unsubsidized full-time employment. This may be accomplished by directly placing and supporting youth in unsubsidized employment, or through an agreement with the employer to partially subsidize the youth’s wage for a period not to exceed 6 months. This grant will typically be used to subsidize 3 to 6 months of full-time employment. Out-of-School youth are those youth that have already acquired their high school diploma or GED.

NOTE: Out-of-school youth that are not actively engaged in pursuing their high school diploma or GED may still be eligible for the program. These youth must actively re-engage in the pursuit of their Diploma or GED. This would make them eligible.

16 Targeted Industries and Careers: All educational enrichment and work readiness projects must be aligned with the career clusters or groups of occupations and industries that have in common a set of foundational knowledge and skills. There are 16 nationally recognized clusters including:

• Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources
• Architecture & Construction;
• Arts;
• Audio/Video Technology & Communications;
• Business Management & Administration;
• Education & Training;
• Finance;
• Government & Public Administration;
• Health Science;
• Hospitality & Tourism;
• Human Services;
• Information Technology;
• Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security;
• Manufacturing;
• Marketing;
• Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics; and
• Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics.


All projects funded under the CYEP program must also provide case management; supportive services; work readiness skills training and career education that is focused on Illinois’ targeted industries and career clusters.

Eligible Youth Participants
The target population for this yearlong grant to be served through this grant will be in-school youth ages 16-24, or out of school youth ages 16-24 who are served in or meet one or more of the following:
A. National School Lunch Program / Free & Reduced Lunch Program
B. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
C. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
D. Other risk factors:
o At risk of involvement or further involvement in the criminal or juvenile justice system, including ex-offenders
o At risk of involvement in the child welfare system
o At risk of education failure (includes risk due to social conditions)
o Youth with no work experience or a history of employment failure
o Homeless youth
o Youth with a disability
o Family income does not exceed 185% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL)

Participants must include documentation to support the above eligibility requirements as well as the following:
• Illinois residency
• Completion of an I9 Form: http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-9.pdf

In-School youth are those youth actively pursuing their high school diploma or GED. Out-of-School youth are those youth that have already acquired their high school diploma or GED. NOTE: Out-of-school youth that are not actively engaged in pursuing their high school diploma or GED may still be eligible for the program. These youth must actively re-engage in the pursuit of their Diploma or GED. This would make them eligible under “A” above.

Program Requirements
All projects funded under this program must provide case management, supportive services, work readiness skills training; career education that is focused on Illinois’ targeted industries and career clusters; job placement and targeted employment opportunities.

A. Project Commitments
Community Youth Employment applicants agree to meet all program requirements including requirements to:
1. Operate a year round project to address career and educational needs of youth while providing the necessary supports for success in these areas.
2. All youth must register in Illinois workNet or other data system as directed by the Department.
3. Provide work readiness activities/opportunities for youth.
4. In school youth will be targeted for part-time employment while out of school youth will be targeted for full time employment or education and part-time employment.
5. Provide employment placements for enrolled youth.
6. Have administrative and fiscal capacity to administer the program according to the Department’s requirements.
7. When the youth’s wage is being temporarily subsidized by the grant, the provider may assume the role of employer of record for the employed youth and process a payroll request every two weeks during this subsidized period if this is formally agreed to in writing by both the employer and provider and the job meets all of the following criteria:
o The job being subsidized is NOT a work experience placement but rather an actual full or part-time job.
o The position is at an official job site of the employer.
o The position is a formal position, with a corresponding job description, within the employer organization.
o The youth’s wage is at least minimum wage.
o The subsidy does not exceed minimum wage.
o The youth’s immediate supervisor is employed by the employer and not the provider.
o The written agreement between the provider and the employer detail the transition of “employer of record” to the employer immediately following the subsidized period of employment.
o The written agreement further delineates the conditions and terms of successful probationary employment, thereby ensuring that when these terms & conditions are met, the youth’s employment will continue under the employer alone.
8. Conduct outreach to identify eligible youth participants and partner with local organizations for referrals to the program.
9. Establish and maintain cooperative relationship with local DHS Family & Community Resource Center (FCRC) offices in the service area to ensure eligible youth referred by FCRCs are enrolled in the program. Non-FCRC referred youth 18 and older are encouraged to apply through ABE to determine potential benefit eligibility.
10. Establish proper eligibility documentation for each youth participant including a signed I9 prior to placing in employment. A file that includes the eligibility documentation must be maintained for each youth participant.
11. Ensure that the youth targeted and served are reflective of the service area and the need presented. In the presence of gender, ethnic and/or racial disparity, the program must work to reduce that disparity.
12. Ensure standardized youth assessments are completed as necessary to inform case plan.
13. Develop an individualized case plan for the youth that will consider at a minimum the following:
o Current educational needs
o Short and Long term Career Educational planning
o Employment readiness and capacity
o Short & long term Career Employment planning
o Barriers to education & employment
o Housing Barriers
o Life Skills needs (age appropriate) based on an assessment – to include:

Daily Living
• Food/Nutrition
• Home Cleanliness
• Home Safety
• Home Repairs
• Computer Basics
• Permanency
Self Care
• Health
• Personal Benefits
• Personal Hygiene
• Personal Safety
• Sexuality
Relationships & Communications
• Personal Development
• Developing Relationships
• Communication
• Cultural Competency
• Domestic Violence
• Legal Permanency
Housing & Money Management
• Budgeting/Spending
• Banking/Credit
• Housing
• Transportation
Work & Study Life
• Personal Development
• Study Skills
• Time Management
• Employment
• Legal
• Income Tax
Permanent Connections
o Conflict resolution / anger management skills
o Decision making skills
o Mental health, substance use and trauma concerns
o Family stability and family responsibilities
o Personal safety and health
14. Document case plan activities and results.
15. All youth must complete a work readiness pre- and post-assessment through Illinois workNet or other data system as directed by the Department.
16. Provide educational enrichment, work readiness, and career education components to all youth.
17. Recruit employers prepared to offer long-term employment opportunities.
18. Ensure employers provide an adequate level of supervision and a quality work opportunity related to sixteen career clusters.
19. A file must be maintained for each worksite and must include among other items, the signed worksite agreement for the worksite location.
20. Perform background checks on any individual that may have an opportunity to be alone with the youth. This will include program staff, mentors, job coaches, etc. A file that includes the results of the background checks and subsequent determination must be maintained for each individual. Youth should not be placed at a jobsite if the employer does not have an adequate policy for conducting background checks and cannot provide such assurances.
21. Provide supportive services to facilitate a positive attendance record.
22. Provide supportive services to ensure youth receive a diploma / GED.
23. Employers will document youth attendance through time sheets.
24. Provide oversight of the program through the monitoring of employment and the continuous assessment of program activities and outcomes.
25. Provide timely reports as required or requested.
26. Track and report all required data elements on the timeline dictated by the Department.
27. Meet minimum performance measures/standards.
28. Ensure representation at mandatory program meetings and trainings convened by or on behalf of the Department.
29. Receive consultation and technical assistance from authorized Department representatives. The program and collaborating partners will be required to be in attendance at site visits by Department staff.

B. Case Management: The implementation of an individualized, assessment based case plan that incorporates learning and employment goals as well as goals to address barriers to successful and sustained career education & employment.

C. Supportive Services: Supportive services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, work clothes, tools and supplies, or other items that are required for youth to participate in the program. Applicants must submit documentation on how the youth will be assessed for supportive services and the internal controls that will ensure the accountability and appropriate expenditure of grant funds.

D. Work Readiness Training: All projects must provide training on the work readiness skills needed for employment using the Illinois workNet portal www.illinoisworknet.com or other data system as directed by the Department. In addition; work readiness activities may also include hands-on experience aligned with the identified Career Clusters.

E. Illinois workNet: All youth applications must be entered in Illinois workNet or other data system as directed by the Department. Once the client has completed an application in Illinois workNet, the case manager will verify eligibility. If eligibility is determined, print the application, have the participant and case manager sign it and maintain it along with the eligibility documentation in the clients file.

An on-line pre-assessment and post-assessment must be administered in Illinois workNet, or other data system as directed by the Department, that will be used to measure the success of the work readiness component of the program. The youth participants should show improvement between their pre-assessment evaluation and their post-assessment evaluation, as well as have completed the following activities:
• Exploring Careers and Training
• Financial Literacy, including opening a bank account
• Workplace skills
• Job Search skills
• Resume Writing
• Applying for a Job
• Interviewing skills
• Personal responsibility/safety, violence awareness and prevention

F. Career Education/Illinois Pathways: Career education includes training that expands the student’s understanding and awareness of career clusters and pathways. Projects will be tied to the courses, work-based learning activities, and credentials/assessments outlined in the Illinois pathways initiative. The objective of these strategies is to provide youth with a structured pathway related to their academic or career interests, as well as resources to fully engage students in their learning and enable them to successfully transition into postsecondary education programs and the workforce.

G. Targeted Industries and Careers: All educational enrichment and work readiness activities must be aligned with the career clusters or groups of occupations and industries that have in common a set of foundational knowledge and skills. There are 16 nationally recognized clusters including:

• Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources
• Architecture & Construction;
• Arts;
• Audio/Video Technology & Communications;
• Business Management & Administration;
• Education & Training;
• Finance;
• Government & Public Administration;
• Health Science;
• Hospitality & Tourism;
• Human Services;
• Information Technology;
• Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security;
• Manufacturing;
• Marketing;
• Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics; and
• Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics.

H. Employer Agreements
All youth employment opportunities must have signed Employer agreements.
• Each agreement must contain, at a minimum, the following items for each worksite included in the agreement:
o Worksite contact and mailing information;
o Detailed information on the worksite such as location, working days and hours, activities, job titles, job descriptions, and number of positions under each;
o Worksite supervisor information;
o Background check policies and assurances;
o A detailed set of mutual terms, conditions, promises, and payments that the grantee and contractor have agreed upon;
o When the employment is fully or partially subsidized, the written agreement must delineate the conditions and terms of successful probationary employment, thereby ensuring that when these terms & conditions are met, the youth’s employment will continue under the employer unsubsidized;
o A listing of participants for each worksite along with their projected start.
o Commitment on the part of the employer to provide long term employment opportunities and not just subsidized employment;
o Commitment on the part of the employer to provide weekly documentation (including signed timesheets) to the provider to verify hours worked etc. for each youth employed along with other attendance information and concerns; and
o Commitment on the part of the employer to provide employment verification and status information for program youth to the provider at 3 months, 6 months and 9 months following the youth’s completion of the program.
• Grantees must ensure that worksites for youth adhere to current workplace safety guidelines.
• Grantees must ensure that worksites for youth adhere to applicable federal/state wage, labor, and workers compensation laws.

I. Background Checks
The applicant must ensure background checks are completed for any staff or volunteer that may come into contact with a minor youth AND for all staff involved in direct service provision for any program youth. The policy should include procedures for interpreting and making employment decisions based on the results. All supervisors of youth at worksites subsidized under this program must pass a background check conducted prior to being allowed to supervise any youth. Background checks are an allowable expense as a condition of employment for program staff.

J. Youth Payroll & Timesheets:
The Grantee must submit payroll documentation to the Department using Illinois workNet, or other data system as directed by the Department, including hourly wage plus the employers FICA and workers compensation that is attributed to the participant. Standardized employer timesheets must be used. The Grantee must maintain the signed timesheet to support the grant expenditures for each participant. Timesheets will be reviewed onsite by DHS and may need to be electronically submitted to the Department as directed.

K. Reporting:
The Grantee’s financial management system shall be structured to provide for accurate, current and complete disclosure of the financial results of the Project funded under this grant program. The general ledger must support costs and revenue reported to the Department and must allow tracing of funds to a level of expenditure adequate to insure funds have been expended appropriately.

Grantees are required to submit reports to DHS as prescribed by the Department. Grantees submittal of required reports allows DHS to monitor the grantees progress toward grant defined goals and their due diligence in grant fiscal management and recordkeeping. Further, grantees will be required to relate financial data to performance accomplishments in their reporting (2 CFR 200.301).

L. Participant File
Each youth participant must have his or her own file and it must be kept securely. It is required to have a minimum of the following in each participant file:
• Application signed by participant and CYEP grantee agency
• Proof of eligibility
• Proof of Illinois residency
• Completed I9 Form
• Employer information
• Document verification of youth wage, FICA, Workers Comp, signed timesheets, etc.
• Illinois workNet pre- and post-assessment documentation.
• Proof of completion of required activities
• Proof of work readiness and career awareness training, supportive services received, etc.
• Assessment documentation.
• Case Plan and supporting documentation of service delivery

M. Records and Retention / Destruction
In accordance with the Community Services Agreement, each provider shall maintain full and complete records of program operations in compliance with state records retention requirements. Records are defined as those documents that capture program activity, participant information and outcomes, and fiscal data. CYEP providers shall comply with the Local Records Act, which regulates the destruction and preservation of public records within the State of Illinois. IDHS may require longer retention of records and/or submission of such records to the Department if the records cover a time period still open to audit.

N. Service Area
Grant funds will be used to address youth unemployment, poverty, and violence in Illinois’ most needy communities. Applications are encouraged and will be considered for services anywhere in the state.

O. Allowable Costs
Allowable costs are those that are necessary and reasonable based on the activity(ies) contained in the Scope of Work are justified in the Budget Narrative, and are allowable under Subpart E of 2 CFR 200. Refer to Notice for additional detail on allowable costs.

Grantees will be held accountable to all state rules and regulations governing the use of these grant funds.

***

Performance Measures
1. Proposed vs. Actual enrolled youth
2. Proposed vs. Actual Job Placements
3. % of enrolled youth meeting eligibility criteria
4. % of eligible FCRC referrals enrolled into the program
5. % of enrolled youth completing an Illinois workNet pre & post assessment evaluation
6. % of enrolled youth completing the 8 required activities in Illinois workNet.
7. % of assessed youth demonstrating work readiness skills improvement
8. % of youth completing career education activities utilizing Illinois Pathways strategies.
9. % of youth receiving Supportive Services
10. % of enrolled youth with an individualized case plan
11. % of youth completing case plan goals
12. % of youth with improved educational outcomes
13. # & % of youth maintaining initial job placement for 3 months or more
14. # & % of youth maintaining initial job placement for 6 months or more
15. # & % of youth maintaining initial job placement for 9 months or more
16. # & % of enrolled youth in unsubsidized job placement at case closure


Performance Standards
1. 100% of proposed youth will be enrolled/served. Acceptable performance 90%.
2. 100% of proposed job placements will be filled with unduplicated youth. Acceptable performance is 90%.
3. 100% of enrolled youth will meet eligibility criteria. Acceptable performance is 100%
4. 100% of eligible FCRC referrals will be enrolled into the program. Acceptable performance is 80%.
5. 100% of enrolled youth will complete an Illinois workNet pre & post assessment evaluation. Acceptable performance is 80%.
6. 100% of enrolled youth will complete the 8 required activities in Illinois workNet. Acceptable performance is 80%.
7. 100 % of assessed youth will demonstrate work readiness skills improvement. Acceptable performance is 80%. Considers only those youth completing the Illinois workNet pre & post assessment evaluation.
8. 100% of youth will complete career education activities utilizing Illinois Pathways strategies. Considers youth participating in one or more Pathways activities that have documented completion of one or more activity.
9. 100% of youth requiring Supportive Services will receive those services. Acceptable performance is 90%. Considers youth assessed and determined to need one or more supportive services compared to those actually receiving that service.
10. 100% of enrolled youth will have an individualized case plan. Acceptable performance 80%.
11. 100% of youth will complete case plan goals. Acceptable performance is 80% of youth will complete 50% or more of case plan goals. Considers only those youth with a case plan developed.
12. 100% of youth will have improved educational outcomes. Acceptable performance is 80%. Considers in-school youth and those out-of-school youth without a HS Diploma or GED. Considers attainment of HS Diploma or GED, Grade level promotion, re-enrollment into HS, enrollment into GED classes, enrollment in Higher Ed or Technical school etc. Considers education status at enrollment compared to case closure.
13. 100% of youth will maintain initial job placement for 3 months or more. Acceptable performance is 80%.
14. 100% of youth will maintain initial job placement for 6 months or more. Acceptable performance is 75%.
15. 100% of youth will maintain initial job placement for 9 months or more. Acceptable performance is 70%.
16. 100% of enrolled youth will be in an unsubsidized job placement at case closure. Acceptable performance is 65%.
Eligibility Requirements
This competitive funding opportunity is limited to community-based organizations and local units of government in Illinois that:
a) are in good standing with the Secretary of State
b) complete the GATA pre-qualification process.

All applicants are required to provide the requested information as outlined in this NOFO to be considered for funding in FY2017.

Applicant agencies may not be eligible for a grant award until they have pre-qualified through the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA) Grantee Portal, www.grants.illinois.gov. During pre-qualification, Dun and Bradstreet verifications are performed including a check of Debarred and Suspended status and good standing with the Secretary of State. The pre-qualification process also includes a financial and administrative risk assessment utilizing an Internal Controls Questionnaire. If applicable, the agency will be notified that it is ineligible for award as a result of the Dun and Bradstreet verification. The entity will be informed of corrective action needed to become eligible for a grant award.

Applicants must:
1. Have the capacity to assume the role of employer of record for the employed youth and process a payroll request every two weeks of the program period if the youth’s wage is being temporarily subsidized by the grant.
2. have the administrative and fiscal capacity to implement the program on a reimbursement basis.
3. Establish and maintain cooperative relationship with local DHS Family & Community Resource Center (FCRC) offices in the service area to ensure eligible youth referred by FCRCs are enrolled in the program. Non-FCRC referred youth 18 and older are encouraged to apply through ABE to determine potential benefit eligibility.
4. have current systems in place to identify eligible underserved populations of youth, and
5. have strong established employer relationships and methods to recruit employers
Eligible Applicants
Government Organizations; Nonprofit Organizations;
Application and Award Processing
a) Pre-application Coordination.
Applicant agencies may not be eligible for a grant award until they have pre-qualified through the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA) Grantee Portal, www.grants.illinois.gov. During pre-qualification, Dun and Bradstreet verifications are performed including a check of Debarred and Suspended status and good standing with the Secretary of State. The pre-qualification process also includes a financial and administrative risk assessment utilizing an Internal Controls Questionnaire. If applicable, the agency will be notified that it is ineligible for award as a result of the Dun and Bradstreet verification. The entity will be informed of corrective action needed to become eligible for a grant award.

b) The Application Procedure.
An Application must be submitted in the format required by the Department and in the manner dictated by the Department. Refer to NOFO for detailed information.

c) Criteria for Selecting Proposals.
All applicants must demonstrate that they meet all requirements under this NOFO as described throughout. Applications that fail to meet the criteria described in the “Eligible Applicants” as identified in section C “Eligibility Information” of the NOFO will not be scored and considered for funding.

Review teams comprised of 3 individuals employed by DHS serving in the Division of Family and Community Services will be assigned to review applications. These review teams, where possible will be comprised of staff within the Bureau or Youth Intervention Services and may include individuals working as Government Public Service Interns under contract from the University of Illinois at Springfield and contract staff.

Applications will first be reviewed and scored individually. Then, team members will collectively review the application, their scores and comments to ensure team members have not missed items within the application that other team members identified. Application highlights and concerns will be discussed. Individual team members may choose to adjust scores to appropriately capture content that may have been missed initially. Scores will then be sent to the application Review Coordinator to be compiled and averaged to produce the final application score. Scoring will be on a 100 point scale with a possible 5 additional priority points awarded based on the service area targeted for implementation.

Proposal Scoring
Application Narratives will be evaluated on the following criteria:

Executive Summary 5 points
Need – Description of Need 10 points
Capacity - Agency Qualification/Organizational Capacity 35 points
Quality of Program/Services 35 points
Evaluation 5 points
Budget & Budget Narrative 10 points

TOTAL 100 POINTS

Priority Points: Up to five (5) additional points will be awarded based on the service area targeted for implementation.

TOTAL + PRIORITY 105 POINTS

Scoring will not be the sole award criterion. The Department, for example may also consider the geographical distribution of Applicants (service areas), areas of high need based on targeted risk factors, etc. While recommendations of the review panel will be a key factor in the funding decisions, the Department maintains final authority over funding decisions and considers the findings of the review panel to be non-binding recommendations. Any internal documentation used in scoring or awarding of grants shall not be considered public information.

Final award decisions will be made by the Director of the Division of Family and Community Services at the recommendation of the Associate Director for the Office of Community and Positive Youth Development. The Department reserves the right to negotiate with successful applicants to adjust award amounts, targets, etc.

d) Award
Applicants recommended for funding under this NOFO following the above review and selection process will receive a Notice of State Award (NOSA). The NOSA shall include:
• The terms and condition of the award.
• Specific conditions assigned to the grantee based on the fiscal and administrative and programmatic risk assessments.

Upon acceptance of the grant award, announcement of the grant award shall be published by the awarding agency to Grants.Illinois.gov.

A written Notice of Denial shall be sent to the applicants not receiving awards.

The NOSA must be signed by the grants officer (or equivalent). This signature effectively accepts the state award and all conditions set forth within the notice. This signed NOSA is the authorizing document. The Agency signed NOSA must be remitted to the Department as instructed in the notice.

e) Appeals.
Refer to DHS Merit Based Review Policy - Appeals Process identified in the Notice

f) Renewals.
This program is designed to be renewed annually, although it is subject to annual appropriation and GATA posting requirements.
Assistance Consideration
a) Formula and Matching Requirements
General Revenue funding to be issued under a Grant agreement for this program does NOT have a required match.

b) Maintenance of effort (MOE).
General Revenue funding to be issued under a Grant agreement for this program is NOT expected to be used by the Department as MOE.

c) Indirect Cost Rate Requirements:
Funding allocated under these grants is intended to provide direct services to youth. It is expected that administrative costs, both direct and indirect, will represent a small portion of the overall program budget. At no time shall indirect costs be charged to the grant at a rate that exceeds 15%. Program budgets and narratives must detail how all proposed expenditures are directly necessary for program implementation and must distinguish between Indirect/Direct Administrative and Direct Program expenses. Any budget deemed to include inappropriate or excessive administrative costs will not be approved. At no time may the approved negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) be exceeded. Documentation will be required to verify the approved NICRA.

In order to charge indirect costs to a grant, agencies must have an annually negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA). There are three types of NICRAs:
• Federally Negotiated Rate. Organizations that receive direct federal funding, may have an indirect cost rate that was negotiated with the Federal Cognizant Agency. Illinois will accept the federally negotiated rate. The organization must provide a copy of the federal NICRA.
• State Negotiated Rate. The organization must negotiate an indirect cost rate with the State of Illinois if they do not have Federally Negotiated Rate or elect to use the De Minimis Rate. If an organization has not previously established an indirect cost rate, an indirect cost rate proposal must be submitted to the State of Illinois through the indirect cost rate system, CARS, no later than three months after the effective date of a state award. If an organization previously established an indirect cost rate, the organization must annually submit a new indirect cost proposal through CARS within six months after the close of the grantee’s fiscal year. All grantees must complete an indirect cost rate negotiation or elect a De Minimis Rate election in CARS – otherwise indirect costs will be subject to disallowance.
• De Minimis Rate. An organization that has never received a Federally Negotiated Rate may elect a De Minimis rate of 10% of modified total direct cost (MTDC). Once established, the De Minimis rate may be used indefinitely. The State of Illinois must verify the calculation of the MTDC annually in order to accept the De Minimis rate.

If programs elect to use the De Minimis rate, is critical that program budgets accurately calculate the MTDC base. Please see the regulations below and note the exclusions. Also note the difference between equipment and supplies, keeping in mind that equipment is excluded from MTDC.

2 CFR § 200.68 Modified Total Direct Cost (MTDC).
MTDC means all direct salaries and wages, applicable fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, and subawards and subcontracts up to the first $25,000 of each subaward or subcontract (regardless of the period of performance of the subawards and subcontracts under the award). MTDC excludes equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs, tuition remission, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs and the portion of each subaward and subcontract in excess of $25,000. Other items may only be excluded when necessary to avoid a serious inequity in the distribution of indirect costs, and with the approval of the cognizant agency for indirect costs.

2 CFR § 200.75 Participant support costs.
Participant support costs means direct costs for items such as stipends or subsistence allowances, travel allowances, and registration fees paid to or on behalf of participants or trainees (but not employees) in connection with conferences, or training projects.

2 CFR § 200.33 Equipment
Equipment means tangible personal property (including information technology systems) having a useful life of more than one year and a per-unit acquisition cost which equals or exceeds the lesser of the capitalization level established by the non-Federal entity for financial statement purposes, or $5,000.


2 CFR § 200.94 Supplies
Supplies means all tangible personal property other than those described in § 200.33 Equipment. A computing device is a supply if the acquisition cost is less than the lesser of the capitalization level established by the non-Federal entity for financial statement purposes or $5,000, regardless of the length of its useful life.

Grantees have discretion not to claim payment for indirect costs. Grantees that elect not to claim indirect costs cannot be reimbursed for indirect costs. The organization must record an election of "No Indirect Costs" into CARS.


d) Additional Funding considerations
1. Youth Wages: Includes compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers compensation. Youth must be paid at least the applicable minimum wage for the jurisdiction in which the youth is employed, and the grant may not provide a wage subsidy in excess of the applicable minimum wage for the jurisdiction in which the youth is employed. Full and Part-time wages may be subsidized in whole or in part with grant funding up to 3 months (13 weeks) per enrolled youth. This calculation of this 3 month limitation only includes periods during which the youth is earning a subsidized wage. The 3 month limitation is a limitation per participant, not per placement. For example, if a youth’s subsidized job placement ends after two months, and the youth receives a new subsidized job placement, the new job placement may only be subsidized for one month. Programs that are able to off-set the wage subsidies with other funds or have the capacity to provide unsubsidized opportunities or step down, or partial subsidies will be able to stretch funding to allow for additional youth to be served in the program.

2. Program Services: Includes, but is not limited to, the delivery of services related to youth employment that provides direct linkages to academic and occupational learning, employer coordination and recruitment, and youth supportive services that may include transportation, child care (refer to the Child Care Assistance program guidelines) work-related attire, physicals, and background checks. Case management services, including educational support, life skills development, reducing barriers to employment, and an array of additional services identified through an individualized assessment.

3. Travel: When determining allowable rates for necessary program-related travel costs such as mileage, per diem, lodging, and airfare, the Travel Guide for State Employees and any current updates issued by the Governor’s Travel Control Board will be used whenever possible. All travel costs should be supported by detailed documentation including records of the purpose of the travel.

4. Subcontractors
A. Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be pre-approved by the Department.
B. Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be on file with the Department.
C. Any subcontractor shall be subject to all provisions of this Agreement.
D. The Provider shall retain sole responsibility for the performance of the subcontractor.

5. Pre-award costs for services in anticipation of an award are allowable where necessary for the efficient and timely performance of the program, and are subject to 2 CFR 200.458. All applicants are eligible to request pre-award costs under one of two categories: 1.) Those applicants that have incurred start-up costs in anticipation of receiving an award; and, 2.) Those applicants that provided CYEP services to eligible youth in anticipation of receiving an award. Applicants are not required to request pre-award costs.

Category 1.) Pre-Award Start-up.
Applicants are eligible to request pre-award costs if they have in fact incurred start-up costs that are allowable and necessary for the efficient and timely performance of the program as defined in the funding notice, and subject to 2 CFR 200.458. This will not include grant writing costs associated with this application as this expense is not considered allowed or necessary for efficient and timely performance of the program. Any and all costs requested must have appropriate and sufficient backup documentation to support the request and demonstrate why the costs were necessary for the efficient and timely performance of the program. Pre-Award costs requested under this category may not pre-date the release of this funding notice.

Category 2.) Pre-Award Programming Start-up.
Applicants are eligible to request pre-award costs if they have been performing CYEP services such since July 1, 2017 AND have appropriate and sufficient backup documentation to support the request AND can demonstrate service delivery in accordance with the requirements and guidelines of this NOFO, including enrolling participants in the Illinois workNet, case planning, making job placements, etc. If applicants are able to meet these requirements and have sufficient fiscal records to support expenditures, applicants may request pre-award costs as part of this application.

Once grant awards are in place for the FY18 Community Youth Employment Program, DHS staff will schedule an on-site review or a desk audit for those grantees that received a pre-award. Staff will review the supporting documentation to confirm there is sufficient evidence to support the pre-award request. If insufficient evidence exists or unallowable costs are identified, necessary adjustments will be made to the pre-award.

Only applicants who receive an award as a result of this NOFO and merit-based review process will be eligible to receive pre-award costs. Any applicant who performed CYEP services on or after July 1, 2017 that does not receive an award will not be eligible for reimbursement of costs incurred. A signed statement confirming that any Pre-Award costs submitted for reimbursement, if paid by the Department, will not constitute supplanting of funds will be required. Costs for services prior to July 1, 2017 will not be approved under any circumstance.

In order to request pre-award costs, should consult the NOFO. Pre-award costs must be included in the applicant’s Uniform Grant Budget, but must be listed separately from expenses expected to be incurred during the grant period. A detailed explanation and justification of any budgeted pre-award costs must be included in the narrative section of the Uniform Grant Budget.

Applicants may ONLY request pre-award costs at the time of application. Exceptions will not be made.
Post Assistance Requirements
a) Reports.
1. The Provider will submit monthly expenditure documentation forms in the format prescribed by the Department. The Expenditure Documentation forms must be submitted no later than the 15th of each month for the preceding month by email.

2. The Provider will submit an annual program application/plan and a detailed program budget and budget narrative to the Department as directed.
3. Quarterly Narrative and Performance data reports will be submitted by email in a format prescribed by the Department, no later than the 15th of the month immediately following the quarter for the preceding quarter.
4. Year-end closeout Financial, Narrative and Performance Data reports will be submitted by email in a format prescribed by the Department, no later than 30 days following the end of the fiscal year.
5. Additional annual performance data may be collected as directed by the Department and in a format prescribed by the Department.

b) Audits.
Grantee shall be subject to the audit requirements contained in the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 (31 USC 7501-7507) and subpart F of 2 CFR Part 200, and the audit rules set forth by the Governor’s Office of Management and Budget. See 30 ILCS 708/65©.

c) Records.
Record retention requirements can be found in CFR 200.333.
Funding By Fiscal Year
FY 2017 : $12,369,909
FY 2018 : $7,992,322
FY 2019 : $13,614,000
Federal Funding
None
Notice of Funding Opportunities
Agency IDAward RangeApplication Range
Details17-444-80-1444-01$50000 - $100000009/09/2016 - 10/11/2016 : 12:00pm
Details18-444-80-1444-01Not Applicable09/22/2017 - 10/20/2017 : 12:00pm
Details19-444-80-1444-01Not Applicable08/08/2018 - 09/07/2018 : 3:00 pm
Agency IDGrantee NameStart DateEnd DateAmount
FCSYR04551-FCSYR04551WESTSIDE HEALTH AUTHORITY07/01/201906/30/20201,647,265
FCSYR04896-FCSYR04896AUSTIN PEOPLE'S ACTION CENTER07/01/201906/30/20201,294,116
FCSYR05186-FCSYR05186ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS NETWORK07/01/201906/30/20201,127,690
FCSYR04555-FCSYR04555LESSIE BATES DAVIS NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE07/01/201906/30/20201,078,590
FCSYR04893-FCSYR04893CHICAGO AREA PROJECT07/01/201906/30/20201,022,795